NACD - National Association of Corporate Directors

Richard Chambers

Richard F. Chambers, CIA, CGAP, CCSA, CRMA, CGFM, is president and CEO of The Institute of Internal Auditors. He has 38 years of internal audit and related experience. Previously, Chambers was national practice leader of Internal Audit Advisory Services at PricewaterhouseCoopers; inspector general of the Tennessee Valley Authority; deputy inspector general of the U.S. Postal Service; and director, U.S. Army Worldwide Internal Review Organization at the Pentagon. He currently serves on the board of the Committee of Sponsoring Organizations of the Treadway Commission (COSO), International Integrated Reporting Council, and IIA board of directors. Previously, he served as chairman of the audit board of the city of Orlando, Fla., and was a member of the U.S. President’s Council on Integrity and Efficiency, IIA Internal Audit Standards Board, and IIA North American Board. Chambers received the Association of Government Accountants’ Frank Greathouse Distinguished Leadership Award, and Accounting Today named him one of the Top 100 Most Influential People in Accounting.

Entries by Richard Chambers

Internal Audit’s Role in Investor Relations

July 11, 2016

As investors push for more transparency, it is important for board members to recognize they have a strong ally in internal audit.

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When Culture is Culprit

May 23, 2016

The key to any analysis of how corporations stray from good governance is to determine who sets the organization’s culture and how culture is managed.

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Communication Has Never Been More Important For Internal Audit

November 24, 2015

A look at how open communication between management, the board, and the chief audit executive can lead to a more accurate risk-based audit plan for the organization.

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Internal Audit’s Role in Corporate Culture

September 17, 2015

Internal audit is in a position to successfully examine and monitor corporate culture, but only if it can develop skills that combine subjective and objective measures.

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Protecting Internal Audit Independence

June 3, 2015

A new report by the Institute of Internal Auditors Research Foundation sheds light on the political pressures facing chief audit executives.

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Tactful Skepticism: What Board Members Should Know About Questioning Management

April 10, 2015

Richard F. Chambers of the Institute of Internal Auditors discusses the importance of directors having a healthy skepticism of company management.

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Developing Integrated Reporting Partnerships

February 2, 2015

Richard F. Chambers of the Institute of Internal Auditors on how corporate boards should encourage internal audit’s role as assurance provider, advisor.

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Do You Have a High-Quality Internal Audit Function?

November 24, 2014

Richard Chambers of the Institute of Internal Auditors helps directors explore whether their company's internal audit is high quality.

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Effective Risk Management and Control: As Easy as 1, 2, 3?

September 25, 2014

Richard F. Chambers highlights an Institute of Internal Auditors position paper about effective risk management.

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Chief Audit Executives: To Rotate or Not to Rotate, That Is the Question

July 18, 2014

Richard Chambers explores the pros and cons to a CAE rotational strategy.

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An Untapped Source of Board Talent

January 13, 2014

Internal auditing’s professional code of ethics…requires practitioners to uphold and apply to their work the principles of integrity, objectivity, and confidentiality. Are these not also critical attributes of directors?

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Think of Internal Audit as the Conscience of the Organization

November 27, 2013

The expression of core organizational values can be a key indicator of a strong tone at the top, as well as an effective way to communicate the behaviors employees are expected to embody and demonstrate.

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Information Overload: Internal Audit And the Disclosure Deluge

A look at the escalating complexity and level of detail in required disclosures—and the toll on corporate directors.

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